While the fabrics of the world financial system is too complicated for anyone to understand it is sometimes possible to track several bold moves that are likely to lead into equally bold consequences.

First of all is the continuous disruption of the world food economics. After I’ve tried to explain the sharp increase of food prices by simple supply and demand the collective finger was pointed toward my nose forcing me to accept that the apparent disruption of the world financial equilibrium is also likely to be the cause.

This is very similar to the gold run that we observed in the past few years. When the trust into dollar future was fading the first reaction of market participants was to hoard something precious to them, like gold. But in the past few weeks the world market discovered that there is something much more precious than gold, like food. If you saw the multitude of movies about wars you probably know that (at least in the movies) during the war a fine gold watch will buy you few cans of spam or a bag of flour. Not that gold is so cheap, but the food is so precious. When millions of people are losing any trust to their local currency (pegged to falling dollar) they resort to hoarding rice, which is relatively easy to store. One bag of rice is equivalent to one gold watch, when the time comes.

Now the second bold move. It’s the apparent shortfall of US tax collections comparing to soaring needs of this administration spending habits. The outstanding treasury debt is quickly approaching $10 trillion, and this is one of biggest Ponzi schemes in the world. This is the story we all know.

And the third bold move is the panic at Japanese bond market this night. Inflation finally reached Japan and the bonds started to fall so fast that the trading was suspended (those guys still don’t understand free markets). The elimination of ZIRP in Japan will lead into many redistributions in the word financial system. For example, I think the eventual introduction of the unified Asian currency may prompt China to sharply increase the purchase of Yens and reduce the purchase of dollars, and now is a good time to start doing so, because the interest rates in Japan will start moving closer to the rest of Asia.

Now the result of all this. Check the chart of the 10Y bond yield:

It clearly broke the trendline by a meaningful margin. The sharpness of the upward move will tell us the magnitude of the disaster. I think this is the most important event on US markets we need to watch now